The Mouth/Body Connection… : ThyBlackMan.com

Wednesday, April 23, 2014


The Mouth/Body Connection…

April 26, 2011 by  
Filed under Health, News, Opinion, Weekly Columns

(ThyBlackMan.com) The mouth is the window to your body’s good health. Excellent oral hygiene – brushing, flossing, and seeing your dentist regularly – can greatly improve your health and reduce the risk of broader medical problems over time.

The research isn’t conclusive, but red, swollen, and bleeding gums can point to health problems from heart disease to diabetes. What can happen is that bacteria from your mouth can travel to your bloodstream, setting off an inflammatory reaction elsewhere in your body. Certain diseases and  medications also may cause mouth problems. Gum disease has been associated with premature birth; teeth grinding with stress; pale gums with anemia; tooth loss with kidney disease; and thrush with HIV.

To maintain your oral health — and overall good health —you should see your dentist regularly to head off any problems early and practice good oral hygiene at home by carefully brushing and flossing your teeth regularly in order to prevent plaque from accumulating and causing problems.

6 Ways that Healthy Teeth and Gums Helps Boost your Health:

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1.Boosts Your Self-esteem and Confidence

Decayed teeth and gum disease are often associated not only with an unsightly mouth but very bad breath — so bad it can affect your confidence, self-image, and self-esteem. With a healthy mouth that’s free of gum disease and cavities, your quality of life is also bound to be better — you can eat properly, sleep better, and concentrate with no aching teeth or mouth infections to distract you.

2. May Lower Risk of Heart Disease

Chronic inflammation from gum disease has been associated with the development of cardiovascular problems such as heart disease, blockages of blood vessels, and strokes. Experts stop short of saying there is a cause-and-effect between gum disease and these other serious health problems, but the link has shown up in numerous studies. The findings of these studies may suggest that maintaining oral health can help protect overall health.

3. Preserves Your Memory

Adults with gingivitis (swollen, bleeding gums) performed worse on tests of memory and other cognitive skills than did those with healthier gums and mouths, according to a report in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.Those with gingivitis were more likely to perform poorly on two tests: delayed verbal recall and subtraction — both skills used in everyday life.

4. Reduces Risks of Infection and Inflammation in Your Body

Poor oral health has been linked with the development of infection in other parts of the body. In one study, poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease was associated with the development of pneumonia in older people. Bacteria in the mouth can travel into the lungs, causing infection or worsening of lung conditions.

Other research has found an association between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joints. Experts say the mechanism of destruction of connective tissues in both gum disease and RA is similar.   Eating a balanced diet, seeing your dentist regularly, and good oral hygiene helps reduce your risks of tooth decay and gum disease. Make sure you brush twice a day and floss once a day. Using an antibacterial mouthwash or toothpaste can help reduce bacteria in the mouth that can cause gingivitis.

5. Helps Keep Blood Sugar Stable if You Have Diabetes

People with uncontrolled diabetes often have gum disease. Having diabetes can make you less able to fight off infection, including gum infections that can lead to serious gum disease. And some experts have found that if you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop more severe gum problems than someone without diabetes.That, in turn, may make it more difficult to control blood sugar levels. Reducing your risk of gingivitis by protecting your oral health may help with blood sugar control if you have been diagnosed with diabetes.

6. Helps Pregnant Women Carry a Baby to Term

Women may experience increased gingivitis during pregnancy. Some research suggests a relationship between gum disease and preterm, low-birth-weight infants.  Not all studies have found a solid link, but maintaining good oral health is still the best goal.  If you’re pregnant, visit your dentist or periodontist as part of your prenatal care. Consider it good practice for the role modeling that lies ahead for all new parents.

Written By Felicia Vance

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